Early Cancer Detection Through Handwriting Analysis

Handwriting is brain-writing.” Graphologists explain that the brain is the director of our physical as well as our mental activity. Just as our writing reflects our personality, so does it reflect certain aberrations in our physiology.

Alfred Kanfer, born in Austria and later imprisoned in Dachau concentration camp along with his wife, is considered the pioneer of the graphological neuromuscular test for determination of groups at high risk for cancer. He had an impressive 84-percent accuracy rate in detecting the disease through handwriting.

What the Kanfer test does is to apply a neuromuscular tool to determine the presence or absence of such characteristic neuromuscular disorders. The Kanfer test alone does not determine the presence or absence of cancer; it determines a factor associated with cancer.

Alfred Kanfer was released from Dachau; he emigrated to the United States. He was an outsider in the field of medicine-with a method for identifying cancer-prone individuals that was so highly unorthodox, that he had a stiff uphill battle to prove his method and find acceptance for it.

What is surprising is the cooperation he received, throughout his more then thirty-five years of work, from many prominent doctors and hospitals.

The Hospital for Joint Diseases in New York, the Preventive Medicine Institute-Strang Clinic in New York, the Equitable Life Assurance Society, the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company and the American Cancer Society provided financial and material support for Kanfer’s work. Their patients’ handwritings were submitted to him for analysis.

The “Heart Tick”

Graphologists have determined that certain breaks in writing, slight interruptions in the upstroke and in the downstroke, especially in letters with loops, can point to heart disease. They call this break a “heart tick” and find it particularly in the lower-case h

(see arrow, Figure 1).

Another sign is abnormal dotting in the course of the writing “trail” (see Figure 2).

In the act of writing, a person with heart trouble-which is often accompanied by shortness of breath-instinctively rests the pen on the paper, as one would do with a stick when walking.

Dr. Ulrich Sonnemann, a major contributor to the early development of professional graphology in the U.S. whose book Handwriting Analysis as a Psychodiagnostic Tool (Grune & Stratton, 1950) is highly respected in the field, confirms that a disrupted pattern of strokes can be indicative of cardiac disease. Sonnemann adds that the specific frailties and incomplete ataxias (the inability to coordinate voluntary muscular movements), which are marked by partial dotting of the course of strokes, have been discovered at very early and clinically undetected stages.

Variations of Normal Handwriting

The foremost tenet in graphology is analyzing the difference between a person’s handwriting and how he was taught to write. There are many shades of instructional technique in script, all of which would be classified under “variations of normal handwriting.” When the writing differs to the extent that it certainly was not taught to the writer this way, that difference is analyzed. The “normal” writing sample is provided as a basis for comparison.

1. Marked difference between downstroke and upstroke pressure in regular sequence throughout a given writing sample.

Characteristics: Downsrokes are broader and show greater ink density than upstrokes.
(1 and 2 in Figure 3).

All downstrokes in a given writing have about the same width, and so do all upstrokes.

2. Elasticity of strokes.

The width of downstrokes gradually increases toward the baseline, where they connect with the upstrokes, and at the same time the upstrokes thin out slightly along their course.

3. Uninterrupted flow of movement through downstrokes and upstrokes.

Characteristics: Uniform, even density of ink throughout the length of downstrokes and upstrokes (1 and 2). Continuous, uninterrupted and unwavering delineations of downstrokes and upstrokes (1 and 2).

4. Uninterrupted flow of movement through area of transition (3 in Figure 3).
Characteristics are as above.

Of specific importance is the uninterrupted joining of downstrokes and upstrokes, which requires a maximum degree of neuromuscular coordination and is therefore of the highest significance.

Finding Cancer in Its Early Stages

A startling example of the accuracy of the diagnosis of cancer through handwriting analysis is the case of Mrs. B. By medical standards, Mrs. B. was found to be healthy from the date of her first handwriting sample to the date of the third. One year after the date of her third sample, at the age of 41, an advanced cancer was found, and she died at 42.

The following samples are microphotographs of Mrs. B’s handwriting.

The first one (Figure 5) was written at age twenty-eight, the second (Figure 6) at age thirty-three, and the third (Figure 7) at age forty.

The first sample, Figure 5, shows the typical criteria of normality-that is, a mature neuromuscular condition with a normal range of coordination. Normality is manifested in the smooth, continuous flow of movement, both in the descending and ascending strokes (uniform flow of ink throughout the strokes and sharp, continuous delineations to both sides of each stroke). The strokes have an oval shape; the turns from descending to ascending strokes are narrow, curved, and show continuity of movement throughout.
A regular pattern of heavier (wider and darker) descending strokes and lighter ascending strokes prevails throughout the sample.

The second sample, Figure 6, shows a marked change. Although the overall pattern of heavier descending strokes and lighter ascending strokes is still preserved, the narrow turns have disappeared, the writing spreads out widely, the strokes are much weaker and highly unstable, and in most of the ascending strokes, clear segmentations can be seen.
(Segmentation means that continuity of movement is interrupted, and the direction of the stroke is seen on microscopic examination to be wavering.) Clear interruptions between descending and ascending strokes are also visible.

The third sample, Figure 7, shows a breakdown of every phase of the writing process.

The strokes are stiff or formless. The pressure is uneven, sometimes too heavy, and in other strokes too light. There are clear interruptions between descending and ascending strokes, and both types of strokes show marked, low-amplitude, high-frequency segmentations.

“With these (and many such) findings it was for the first time shown with statistical significance that the manifestations of cancer in handwriting precede the manifestations of cancer by clinical signs.” (Bulletin of the Hospital for Joint Diseases, April 1, 1958)

Setbacks

Although Kanfer’s handwriting test was remarkable, he did make some blunders along the way, which had to be corrected. While he was able to clearly separate the healthy handwritings from the ones indicating cancer or heart disease, he erred by diagnosing a considerable number of the heart cases as positive for cancer. In later studies, with sharpening of the cancer criteria, this cause of error was practically eliminated.

A second error involved inappropriate use of materials and turned up when three tests were conducted under the auspices of the American Cancer Society. The first and third test ranged between 84 and 98.4 percent in the accuracy of detection of cancer.

The second study was the only one that failed. It was carried out on samples gathered at a Detroit cancer detection center. The reason for this failure, as later established, was faulty technical arrangements. The patients were made to write with a hard glass plate as a writing support and had to use a rigid, fine-point pen, a combination that made the finer segmentations in the stroke practically invisible, even to the microscopic equipment then available.

When this error was recognized, some changes were made in the microscopic technique and some of the samples were re-examined. Kanfer’s results were then considered “very good” by the Cancer Society. Nevertheless, this failure set his work back many years and demonstrated the importance of technical considerations in research.

Unresolved Questions

Many questions remain unresolved. What about the problem of a handwriting that “tests positive” when there is no medical diagnosis? What effects does that information have? What psychological harm can it do when there is no detectable cancer to treat?

This problem affected Kanfer himself. He went to the Strang Clinic doctors to tell them that he saw positive indicators of cancer in his own handwriting. They couldn’t find the cancer until three weeks before he died.

Although graphology’s strength lies primarily in personality evaluation, in which it achieves up to 98 percent accuracy, the statistical significance attributed to the Kanfer test remains great. The need for more research is vital.

Author’s note: Please do not try to diagnose yourself or others using this technique. It takes a professional to recognize the nuances of change in a handwriting sample.

Mentalist Are Good In Curing Mental Problems

The Mentalist in New York is place the major role on crime and investigations and the mentalist can served with the knack of observing minute to minute details. Mentalist in New York can solve the mental problems and the Mentalist in New York is said to use a supernatural powers that are mind reading, hypnosis and memory related feats.

The Mentalist in New York cannot perform any kind of stage tricks. Mentalist solves the people how conceive a situation, think, remember, speak and take plug in solving problems. The Mentalist in New York can have the supernatural powers and the mentalist hypnotizing you and controls your body motions. Today Mentalist in New York is elevated from a street shows and TV shows etc. these all public demonstrations are arranged properly by the Mentalist in New York.

The Mentalist in New York not only entertain the people and also help the people by the hypnotizing them. There are many mentalists are available in New York city and they can provide the many skills that are mind reading, palm reading fortune telling, hypnotism etc. the Mentalist in New York should be perform a one man show. The Mentalist in New York is have the art of involving on your mental ability to spread a spell of illusion over the viewers same as stage magic.

The Mentalist in New York is very good for using mind techniques and psychokinetic skills. Hypnosis is one of the methods in a mentalism. Hocus pocus is magic spell and it is used the Mentalist in New York for step by step wise. The Mentalist in New York is used a mind reading easily on the volunteer. The New York people fascinated with the mentalism. The human beings always attracted for sea life, extra terrestrial activity, animals and planets. The human brain always works fascination. The mentalism is an offshoot of the similar interest.

The Mentalist in New York joins CBI and an opportunity for the skills of cold reading, pick pocketing, understands the human psyche. Mentalist in New York is a one man show and the mentalist read your thoughts and extrasensory perception. The Mentalist in New York is a star struck gold and the Mentalist activities are very famous since ancient times and the mentalist job is not an easy job. The New York City people can get the Mentalist in New York easily finds out an appropriate way. The activities performed by the people and they are inspired from the psychological points of human beings.

The Mentalist in New York is views the objectives of mental perception to divert and entertain the audience. The Mentalist in New York is also provides the magical illusions and these are combined with many factors that are precognition abilities, psychic power. The psychic power controls the mind of a person and person attention. The Mentalist in New York is catching the attention and the mentalist acts are surprises the audience. The Mentalist in New York is also provides online helping.

Asthma – Status Asthmaticus

Asthma is a chronic respiratory disorder in which a person experiences difficulty in breathing, accompanied by wheezing and a “tight” chest. Additional symptoms can be a dry cough and vomiting (usually in children). An asthma attack may start suddenly; the fear and worry that this causes can prolong the attack.

Question: What causes asthma attacks?

Asthma attacks are caused by a narrowing of the small bronchial tubes in the lungs. The most common kind of asthma (allergic bronchial asthma) is caused by an allergic reaction. Many pollens, molds, dusts (especially dust containing the house mite), and animal hair and dander can cause allergic-type asthma attacks.

Asthmatic symptoms are sometimes associated with hay fever. Infection in the respiratory system, exposure to cold, exercise, fatigue, irritating fumes, and certain emotional and psychological states can all trigger an asthma attack. These conditions may also serve as secondary factors that increase the severity or frequency of attacks. Asthma from these causes may occur in people who have no history of allergic reactions, as well as in those who do.

Question: How does asthma interfere with breathing?

Air passes through the lungs via tubes (called bronchi) and smaller vessels (bronchioles). With asthma, the smaller bronchi and bronchioles become swollen and clogged with mucus, and the muscles surrounding the bronchioles contract so that the air that should pass through is unable to do so. The body reacts to the lack of oxygen, and the patient forces more and more air into the lungs. But, because of the blockages, there is difficulty in exhaling it. The wheezing noise is caused by air being forcibly exhaled through the narrowed bronchi.

Question: How long does an asthma attack last?

An attack of asthma may last for a few minutes, but most go on for several hours. A severe, prolonged attack (a form of asthma known as status asthmaticus) may last for a number of hours or even days. A person with status asthmaticus requires hospitalization.

Question: What immediate help can be given to a person suffering from asthma?

With more severe attacks it is important that the patient sit up-right, either in a chair or in bed, propped up by pillows. A table in front of the patient is useful; this can be grasped and the arm muscles used to assist breathing. A patient is rarely hungry, but should be encouraged to drink large amounts of liquids. Bronchial dilator inhalants from aerosol cans may be helpful in relaxing the muscles of the bronchioles. These are available by prescription and must be used according to a physician’s direction. Severe episodes of asthma require immediate medical attention.

Question: How does a physician treat asthma between attacks?

The goal is to prevent an attack by keeping the bronchi and bronchioles from becoming narrowed. Theophylline, or such adrenergic drugs as epinephrine and isoproterenol, can relieve bronchospasms and, thus, help to prevent bronchial obstruction. (These drugs can also be used during an asthma attack.) Corticosteroids may be useful for short-term relief in severe cases. A new type of inhalant drug, cromolyn sodium (disodium cromoglycate or DSCG), has also proven successful in preventing asthmatic attacks in some persons. The proper drug or combination of drugs will depend upon the prescribing physician as well as the course of the disorder.

Question: What is the treatment for severe asthma (status asthmaticus)?

An attack of status asthmaticus requires hospitalization and urgent treatment. Some drug treatments are best administered as a mist through a breathing apparatus. Strong bronchodilators can relieve the attack by relaxing the spasms in the bronchioles. In this situation the patient may be attached to a mechanical respirator to aid breathing.

Question: Apart from taking the appropriate drugs, what other precautions can be taken to prevent an asthma attack?

Several simple measures can reduce the risk of attack. The appropriate medication should be taken prior to events known to trigger an episode-before exercise, for example. A person with allergic asthma should sleep in a room without carpets or rugs. Blankets and pillows of synthetic fiber reduce the risk of house dust and mites. In dry climates, a humidifier can be used to increase the moisture content of the air in the room.

For patients in whom asthma is caused by respiratory infection, breathing exercises may be of value. A respiratory therapist can teach the patient the most appropriate ones. These exercises are not only a psychological help in preventing an attack, but when a minor respiratory infection does occur, the lungs should function more efficiently. An asthmatic patient should seek medical advice promptly when suffering from a respiratory infection.

Question: Are there any complications involved with chronic asthma?

Because so much air is held in the lungs during an asthma attack, the air sacs (alveoli) can become so stretched that the cell walls may tear. This damage causes a gradual loss of elasticity in the lungs and can lead to the condition known as emphysema. If the patient coughs too much, the surface of a lung may burst, causing the air to escape into the cavity that encloses the lung (pleural cavity). This condition is known as a pneumothorax.

Other complications can arise from the mucous secretions that do not drain properly during an asthma attack. This can lead to bronchitis and sometimes bronchial pneumonia. Frequent attacks may result in chronic bronchitis.

Question: What other disorders might be confused with asthma?

A disorder mistakenly known as cardiac asthma has symptoms similar to asthma (gasping for breath, a “tight” chest), but is actually a type of heart disease. Immediate medical attention is required.

Question: Can asthma be cured completely?

Asthma cannot be cured. The possibility of future attacks can, however, be minimized by drugs and other preventives, but if a person is disposed to asthma, there is always a chance that an attack will occur.

Question: Is asthma common in children?

Asthma is fairly common in childhood, usually first occurring between the ages of three and eight. Most attacks are an allergic reaction to airborne pollen, certain foods, animal hair, and some other substances. The majority of children with asthma are from families with a history of the illness. Before puberty, asthma occurs more often among boys than girls; after puberty, the incidence is fairly equal between the sexes. Medical treatment includes teaching a child and his or her parents how to detect symptoms of an attack and how to use prescribed medications. Emotional stress can often trigger an asthma attack; children with emotional problems may thus require some form of psychological support.